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The Best of Gival Press Short Stories

The Best of Gival Press Short Stories

Robert L. Giron

This collection of Gival Press award-winning stories can both inspire and instruct as they deal with the complexities in one's everyday life which can lead to tragedy (Water by Tim Johnston) to the revelation of the moment that can stun (I-95, Southbound by Perry Glasser) to one's betrayal (Void by Karenmary Penn) to mysterious and ambiguous motivations that drive our impulses (Harvest Cycle by Marie Holmes) to a family member who discovers his sexuality (Legacy by Iqbal Pittalwala) to one's partner who can't feel the music that liberates (The Music She Will Never Hear by Kristin FitzPatrick) to entering the loneliness of a young man's aspirations (On the Verge by Tim Mullaney) to echoes of the ancient Cain and Abel rivalry (Progressive Linkage by Steven J. Cahill) to how we calculate our decisions and live our difficult lives (Fat Tails by Daniel Degnan) to how we struggle to connect with others (Better Terms by Mark Wisniewski) to understanding the complexities of others' relationships (For All the Obvious Reasons by Lynn Stegner).

In short, these stories will hold your attention because they are vividly cast and the characters are so real you are bound to identify with them on different levels, even if you may not be walking in their footsteps. A perfect collection for composition, introduction to literature, fiction, or creative writing to guide students to write compelling stories.

Robert L. Giron

Robert L. Giron is the author of five collections of poetry and editor of five anthologies. His poetry and fiction have appeared in national and international anthologies among other publications. He was born in Nebraska, but he describes himself as a transplanted Texan, with family roots that go back over four centuries, who lives in Arlington, Virginia. He discovered recently that his ancestry covers most of Europe and the greater Mediterranean area, including Indigenous roots from Mexico/Texas. He describes himself as “just a man of the world.”

Robert L. Giron
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